Vitamin C And The Common Cold Pdf

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vitamin c and the common cold pdf

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Early Evidence About Vitamin C And the Common Cold

Vitamin C and the Common Cold is a popular book by Linus Pauling , first published in , on vitamin C , its interactions with common cold and the role of vitamin C megadosage in human health. A Nobel Prize-winning chemist and activist, Pauling promoted a view of vitamin C that is strongly at odds with most of the scientific community, which found little evidence for the alleged health benefits of greatly increased vitamin C intake.

The book characterizes the inability of humans and some other animals to produce vitamin C in terms of evolution and Pauling's concept of "molecular disease" first articulated in his study, " Sickle Cell Anemia, a Molecular Disease ". Pauling argues that the loss of vitamin C synthesis first arose as a molecular disease, because of a genetic mutation that resulted in the loss of the biochemical capacity to make the vitamin, but because diets of the primate ancestors of humans consisted of high levels of vitamin C from plant sources, the loss of that biochemical mechanism was not harmful and may have even been beneficial.

He argues, however, that the subsequent shift to a high-meat, lower-plant diet resulted in widespread vitamin C deficiency. Pauling began studying vitamin C mega-dosage, and orthomolecular medicine more broadly, after he was contacted in by biochemist Irwin Stone , who suggested that taking enough vitamin C would let him live another fifty years.

Pauling reinterpreted the large body of research on vitamin C based on comparative studies of the biochemical genetics of vitamin C synthesis in different species, as well his own theories about "molecular disease" and recent developments in molecular evolution. He criticized the design of studies that did not find positive results for vitamin C mega-dose treatment, and promoted those that did.

He and other vitamin C advocates thought the vitamin boosts the body's ability to fight all kinds of infection. By , after following Stone's regimen for four years and studying and debating the issue extensively, Pauling was sure enough that organized medicine had it wrong that he wrote Vitamin C and the Common Cold to popularize his vitamin C message.

In , he found an in-depth study from public health researcher at the University of Minnesota, "Vitamins for the Prevention of Colds", which became a focal point for his subsequent criticism of what he saw as flawed vitamin C research.

By , following confrontations with researchers holding to the mainstream view of vitamin C, Pauling expanded the book to include evidence related to a wide variety of other illnesses, and the flu in particular. The book was well received by the public and garnered considerable popular attention, resulting in a rush of vitamin C sales. Paperback editions were issued in and , and Pauling subsequently authored several related books: Vitamin C and Cancer and How to Live Longer and Feel Better The book and Pauling himself faced considerable criticism from scientists and physicians.

Marshall author of Vitamins and Minerals: Help or Harm? Marshall also noted that "there have been at least 30 experiments done to test the effects of vitamin C against colds in humans. Most biomedical scientists who have analyzed the results of these trials have found Pauling's claims mainly unsupported in 15 of those trials which were the best designed.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. This article is about the book by Linus Pauling. For vitamin C and health, see Vitamin C and the common cold. San Francisco: W. Vitamins and Minerals: Help or Harm? George F. Stickley Company. Linus Pauling. Categories : Vitamin C Medical books Orthomolecular medicine. Namespaces Article Talk. Views Read Edit View history. Help Learn to edit Community portal Recent changes Upload file. Download as PDF Printable version. Add links.

Cover image of Vitamin C and the Common Cold. Vitamin C and the common cold.

Vitamin C for preventing and treating the common cold

Jump to navigation. The common cold is a major cause of visits to a doctor in high-income countries and of absenteeism from work and school. There are over viruses which can cause the common cold symptoms including runny nose, congestion, sneezing, sore throat, cough, and sometimes headache, fever and red eyes. Symptoms vary from person to person and cold to cold. Since the common cold is usually caused by one of the respiratory viruses, antibiotics are useless and therefore other potential treatment options are of substantial public health interest. Vitamin C has been proposed for treating respiratory infections since it was isolated in the s. It became particularly popular in the s when Nobel laureate Linus Pauling concluded from earlier placebo-controlled trials that vitamin C would prevent and alleviate the common cold.

Medwave se preocupa por su privacidad y la seguridad de sus datos personales. It is generally believed that the consumption of vitamin C prevents its appearance, but the actual efficacy of this measure is controversial. We extracted data from the systematic reviews, reanalyzed data of primary studies, conducted a meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table using the GRADE approach. We concluded the consumption of vitamin C does not prevent the incidence of common cold. The common cold is one of the most common diseases in the general population. The term "common cold" does not refer to a specific condition, but to a group of symptoms such as nasal obstruction, sore throat, cough, lethargy and asthenia, with or without fever.

Skip to search form Skip to main content You are currently offline. Some features of the site may not work correctly. Internationale Zeitschrift fur Vitamin- und Ernahrungsforschung. Journal international de vitaminologie et de nutrition. In Linus Pauling claimed that vitamin C prevents and alleviates the episodes of the common cold. Pauling was correct in concluding from trials published up till then, that in general vitamin C does have biological effects on the common cold, but he was rather over-optimistic as regards the size of benefit. View on PubMed.

Excerpts from Vitamin C and the Common Cold by Linus Pauling

Vitamin C and the Common Cold is a popular book by Linus Pauling , first published in , on vitamin C , its interactions with common cold and the role of vitamin C megadosage in human health. A Nobel Prize-winning chemist and activist, Pauling promoted a view of vitamin C that is strongly at odds with most of the scientific community, which found little evidence for the alleged health benefits of greatly increased vitamin C intake. The book characterizes the inability of humans and some other animals to produce vitamin C in terms of evolution and Pauling's concept of "molecular disease" first articulated in his study, " Sickle Cell Anemia, a Molecular Disease ".

Vitamin C supplementation and the common cold--was Linus Pauling right or wrong?

To investigate whether vitamin C is effective in the treatment of the common cold. Extra doses of vitamin C could benefit some patients who contract the common cold despite taking daily vitamin C supplements. The common cold, known simply as a cold, is defined as an upper respiratory tract infection URTI caused by various viruses, characterized by symptoms like coughing or sneezing, sore throat, stuffy or runny nose, headache, fever, muscle aches or aching limbs, and so on [ 1 , 2 ].

Meeting the recommended levels of intake for all essential micronutrients is important for optimal immune function see Immunity In-brief article. When it comes to the common cold specifically, there is evidence that routine supplementation with vitamin C can reduce the occurrence and duration of the common cold in certain individuals. Use of oral zinc lozenges may influence cold symptoms and duration, but there are important caveats associated with their use. The common cold is a viral infection of the upper respiratory tract nose and throat.

Skip to search form Skip to main content You are currently offline. Some features of the site may not work correctly. Pauling Published For many years there has existed the popular belief that ascorbic acid has value in providing protection against the common cold and in ameliorating the manifestations of this viral disease. This belief has not, however, been generally shared by physicians, authorities on nutrition, and official bodies.

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