Private Empire Exxonmobil And American Power Pdf

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private empire exxonmobil and american power pdf

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In the great reach for colonies that Europe began hundreds of years ago, at center stage were several curious entities that wielded more power than many governments. The United Company of Merchants of England Trading to the East Indies commonly known as the East India Company and its counterpart, the Dutch East India Company, fielded their own warships and armies, coined money and ruled territory eventually taken over by Britain and the Netherlands. Centuries from now, historians sweltering away on an overheated planet and looking back to our own times will surely see multinational oil companies as similar players. If revenue were counted as gross domestic product, the corporation would rank among the top 30 countries. Coll quotes a cable from the United States Embassy in Chad noting that Exxon was ignoring American diplomats there.

Private Empire: ExxonMobil and American Power For Kindle

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Other editions. Enlarge cover. Error rating book. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Details if other :. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Preview — Private Empire by Steve Coll. In Private Empire Steve Coll investigates the largest and most powerful private corporation in the United States, revealing the true extent of its power.

Yet despite its outsized influence, it is a black box. The action spans the globe, moving from Moscow, to impoverished African capitals, Indonesia, and elsewhere in heart-stopping scenes that feature kidnapping cases, civil wars, and high-stakes struggles at the Kremlin. He draws here on more than four hundred interviews; field reporting from the halls of Congress to the oil-laden swamps of the Niger Delta; more than one thousand pages of previously classified U.

A penetrating, newsbreaking study, Private Empire is a defining portrait of ExxonMobil and the place of Big Oil in American politics and foreign policy. Get A Copy. Hardcover , pages. Published May 1st by Penguin Press first published January 1st More Details Original Title.

Other Editions Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Private Empire , please sign up. Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Average rating 3. Rating details. More filters. Sort order. May 14, Holly Morrow added it. Oh, you know I had to read this. OK, first things first: this book is only for the hardcore. I am about as highly motivated a reader as Steve Coll is likely to find, but it just gets loooong.

OK, next: its not a hatchet job. I found it overall quite fair. The substance is accurate and generally criticizes where criticism is warranted though praise is perhaps a bit spare and the stories that he chooses to explore in depth seem selected with a preference for showing the company in a negative light.

As Coll himself states in the introduction, he wanted to write a book about American corporate power and how it is its own force — separate and apart from traditional government power. He just repeatedly cues the Darth Vader music and then moves on.

So, given that that is a, maybe THE, central theme in the book, its an important flaw. Moreover, it assumes an omnipotence that is laughably far from what reality feels like in the company — beleaguered, subject to the whim of geology and fickle, irrational, and sometimes venal governments — both foreign and here at home. What he gets very right is the culture of the company — diligent, priggish, smart as hell, data-driven, disciplined and rigorous to a fault, unsentimental.

I have laughed with some ex-military guys in the company about how easy the transition must have been. And he captures very well the transition from Lee Raymond, the extremely hard-assed former CEO, to Rex Tillerson — a transition that held some subtle but important shifts in company policy. At any rate, I suspect this book will be a lot more ExxonMobil than people really want to curl up with.

But I found it overall well-done and fair, if one cuts through the sinister and ominous smoke that wafts about in the tone of the book starting with the black cover and scary title and focuses on the substance. View 1 comment. May 25, HBalikov rated it really liked it. I want to add this to my previous review because this book is still relevant for understanding this major global corporation.

While the company appears to remain confident that future climate change policies and regulations will not materially impact its operations or financial well-being, it remains to be seen what effect the recent New York lawsuit will have on that message. Investors, especially activist investors and other concerned stakeholders will be paying great attention as to how the lawsuit unfolds and what information is gained regarding the use of proxy costs.

That, in turn, should serve as a warning to oil and gas and other carbon-intensive companies, who should exercise caution in assessing how climate change impacts are measured internally and externally, how those risks are communicated to shareholders, and whether those messages are consistent. Most of us think we know ExxonMobil, but and I promise to keep my puns to a minimum like their major investments, much lies below the surface.

I learned a lot from Coll's book because he: 1. Avoids a lot of jargon; 2. Keeps any political agenda to a minimum; 3. Gives us lay people an understanding of Exxon's world in a way we can understand; 4. Describes how complex it is to run a business of this size and diversity: and, 5. Highlights the lurking corporatocracy in this company's dealings in the USA and foreign countries. I wonder if he were writing it in would he: 1. Give us more of a focus on the company's attitude s toward climate change?

Discuss more about their bedfellows in lobbying? Focus on investments such as their multi-billion dollar play in algae? Draw more links between USA's foreign policy and Exxon's interests. Plenty of documentation for the research and interviews Coll conducted make this a thought-provoking read. View all 10 comments. Jul 14, Minyoung Lee rated it really liked it. Disclaimer: I worked for and been involved in Exxon's major competitor since , and therefore my perspective of Exxon and this book in general may be skewed.

A lot of the focus of the book is based on this recent history of Exxon, which I was actually fortunate to have lived through and experienced, so I may have more of an appreciation of what the author is trying to portray about the company and the industry during the time.

That being said, I found this book extremely entertaining and true Disclaimer: I worked for and been involved in Exxon's major competitor since , and therefore my perspective of Exxon and this book in general may be skewed.

That being said, I found this book extremely entertaining and true to the sentiment of what most non-Exxon people in the industry feel about Exxon. Admittedly, the content of the book was slightly different to what I had expected. I had expected some individual's viewpoints and preachy commentary, but was pleasantly surprised to find that the entire book pretty much comprised of detailed and very visual anecdotes.

The overall tone of the book is very objective, and the author is definitely not trying to force anything down the reader's throat, and I appreciate this aspect of the writing very, very much.

The truth just simply is that Exxon is an extremely large and powerful company driven by stakeholder profits, and is very successful at what it does. It currently holds a credit rating better than that of the US. Us "smaller" oil companies and the general public as well, I suppose like to diss the company as evil and unethical, but maybe Exxon's strategy of completely disengaging itself from "morals" is exactly what makes the company so profitable in the first place.

So kudos to Exxon and the niche it had paved in the industry and the US economy. Love it or hate it, one still has to admit, that this formidable monster of a corporation does affect so much of the every contemporary person's life. The author did a very good job of depicting a very sensitive topic in a very objective, readable tone. Jan 15, Mikey B. This is an indelible picture of the long-standing oil enterprise. Even though the style is understated, factual and sometimes sardonic we are given an up-close view, of what for all intents and purposes, is a most nefarious business.

Extracting oil is their primary activity — what happens to the environment and the people in the land they occupy is all secondary. Only recently — when Rex Tillerson took the helm of ExxonMobil in This is an indelible picture of the long-standing oil enterprise. Only recently — when Rex Tillerson took the helm of ExxonMobil in did it begin to acknowledge that global warming and climate change were occurring. Prior, they were in full denial. The estimates of the reserves of both natural gas and oil have risen over the last few years — partially because of new discoveries and new technology.

However the extraction processes are still in the development stages and getting to these reserves is becoming more and more environmentally invasive — leading to more global warming. ExxonMobil as do the other major oil companies have nicely documented procedures on how to deal with oil spills and other environmental calamities — but this is just paper — the actual resources equipment such as planes, trucks ExxonMobil devotes a significant portion of their environmental documentation on dealing with the media.

The saddest and most revealing parts of the book are how ExxonMobil inhabits impoverished countries. The author demonstrates that in the African countries the quality of living has not improved not so sure about Indonesia. While it may not be ExxonMobil role to manage the distribution of wealth in these societies — they themselves are profiting immensely from these ventures.

One could argue that this is exploitation pure and simple. After all, if one goes into a country and makes a ton of money should you not give something in return?

Private Empire: ExxonMobil and American Power For Kindle

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Other editions. Enlarge cover. Error rating book.

Look Inside. May 01, Minutes Buy. A penetrating, news-breaking study, Private Empire is a defining portrait of Big Oil in American politics and foreign policy. Steve Coll investigates the largest and most powerful private corporation in the United States, revealing the true extent of its power. Yet despite its outsized influence, it is a black box.

Private empire

Steve Coll. New York: Penguin Press, Journalist Steve Coll traces the unsettling developments within the premier descendant of Standard Oil between the Exxon Valdez spill in and the Deepwater Horizon disaster in

Private Empire: Exxonmobil and American Power

The oil giant ExxonMobil makes more money annually than the GDP of most countries; has greater sway than US embassies abroad; and spends more on lobbying than any other corporation. Yet to outsiders it is a mystery. In "Private Empire", award-winning reporter Steve Coll tells the truth about the world's most powerful and shadowy company. From the Exxon Valdez accident in to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, via Moscow, the swamps of the Niger Delta and the halls of Congress, he reveals a story of dictators, oligarchs, civil war, blackmail, secrecy and ruthlessness.

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Steve Coll. New York: Penguin Press, Journalist Steve Coll traces the unsettling developments within the premier descendant of Standard Oil between the Exxon Valdez spill in and the Deepwater Horizon disaster in He argues that we should think of Exxon not as a "normal" company but as a private state, executing its own foreign policy in a search for increasingly coy oil and natural gas reserves. On the domestic front, Exxon shapes policy by funding suspect science, by contributing large sums to oil-friendly politicians, and by hiring the best attorneys to defend its dubious practices. In general, Coil's conclusions about the behemoth company are convincing, and Private Empire is a significant contribution to the study of contemporary problems in

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  1. Archer B. 02.05.2021 at 07:31

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  4. Kathy C. 07.05.2021 at 14:02

    Coll, Steve. Private empire: ExxonMobil and American power / by Steve Coll. p. cm. Includes bibliographical references and index. ISBN 1.

  5. Lorungfira1968 09.05.2021 at 17:29

    PRIVATE EMPIRE: EXXONMOBIL AND AMERICAN. POWER. By Steve Coll​, Penguin Press Reviewed by William A. Mogel*. Readers of this Journal.