Seeing White An Introduction To White Privilege And Race Pdf

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seeing white an introduction to white privilege and race pdf

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Beyond recognition, white people can use their white privilege in a way that is beneficial to all people. Rather than centering your own feelings of discomfort, center the feelings of people of color in evaluating what to do with this information. You can use your privilege to amplify those voices. Share the work and perspectives of people of color on social media. Credit colleagues of color for ideas.

Seeing White Study Guide

For many, white privilege was an invisible force that white people needed to recognize. It was being able to walk into a store and find that the main displays of shampoo and panty hose were catered toward your hair type and skin tone.

It was being able to turn on the television and see people of your race widely represented. It was being able to move through life without being racially profiled or unfairly stereotyped. All true. This idea of white privilege as unseen, unconscious advantages took hold.

Those interpretations overshadow the origins of white privilege, as well as its present-day ability to influence systemic decisions. They overshadow the fact that white privilege is both a legacy and a cause of racism.

And they overshadow the words of many people of color, who for decades recognized white privilege as the result of conscious acts and refused to separate it from historic inequities. And if we stand behind the belief that recognizing white privilege is integral to the anti-bias work of white educators, we must offer a broader recognition. A recognition that does not silence the voices of those most affected by white privilege; a recognition that does not ignore where it comes from and why it has staying power.

Having white privilege and recognizing it is not racist. But white privilege exists because of historic, enduring racism and biases. Therefore, defining white privilege also requires finding working definitions of racism and bias. So, what is racism?

One helpful definition comes from Matthew Clair and Jeffrey S. Racism differs from bias , which is a conscious or unconscious prejudice against an individual or group based on their identity. Basically, racial bias is a belief. Racism is what happens when that belief translates into action. For example, a person might unconsciously or consciously believe that people of color are more likely to commit crime or be dangerous.

A person might become anxious if they perceive a black person is angry. That stems from a bias. These biases can become racism through a number of actions ranging in severity, and ranging from individual- to group-level responses:. Both racism and bias rely on what sociologists call racialization. This is the grouping of people based on perceived physical differences, such as skin tone.

This arbitrary grouping of people, historically, fueled biases and became a tool for justifying the cruel treatment and discrimination of non-white people.

And while not all white people participated directly in this mistreatment, their learned biases and their safety from such treatment led many to commit one of those most powerful actions: silence.

And just like that, the trauma, displacement, cruel treatment and discrimination of people of color, inevitably, gave birth to white privilege. White privilege is—perhaps most notably in this era of uncivil discourse—a concept that has fallen victim to its own connotations.

The two-word term packs a double whammy that inspires pushback. Otherwise, only the choir listens; the people you actually want to reach check out. White privilege is not the suggestion that white people have never struggled.

Many white people do not enjoy the privileges that come with relative affluence, such as food security. Many do not experience the privileges that come with access, such as nearby hospitals.

And white privilege is not the assumption that everything a white person has accomplished is unearned; most white people who have reached a high level of success worked extremely hard to get there.

Francis E. In a thorough article , education researcher Jacob Bennett tracked the history of the term. But some people of color continued to insist that an element of white privilege included the aftereffects of conscious choices.

Having the ability to maintain that power dynamic, in itself, was a white privilege, and it endures. Legislative bodies, corporate leaders and educators are still disproportionately white and often make conscious choices laws, hiring practices, discipline procedures that keep this cycle on repeat. The more complicated truth: White privilege is both unconsciously enjoyed and consciously perpetuated. It is both on the surface and deeply embedded into American life.

It is a weightless knapsack—and a weapon. Sometimes the examples used to make white privilege visible to those who have it are also the examples least damaging to people who lack it. But that does not mean these examples do not matter or that they do no damage at all. These subtle versions of white privilege are often used as a comfortable, easy entry point for people who might push back against the concept.

That is why they remain so popular. But the root of these problems is often ignored. This may be true. But the reason even these simple white privileges need to be recognized is that the damage goes beyond the inconvenience of shopping for goods and services.

White people become more likely to move through the world with an expectation that their needs be readily met. People of color move through the world knowing their needs are on the margins. Recognizing this means recognizing where gaps exist. White people are also more likely to see positive portrayals of people who look like them on the news, on TV shows and in movies. They are more likely to be treated as individuals, rather than as representatives of or exceptions to a stereotyped racial identity.

In other words, they are more often humanized and granted the benefit of the doubt. They are more likely to receive compassion, to be granted individual potential, to survive mistakes. This has negative effects for people of color, who, without this privilege, face the consequences of racial profiling, stereotypes and lack of compassion for their struggles. This privilege is invisible to many white people because it seems reasonable that a person should be extended compassion as they move through the world.

It seems logical that a person should have the chance to prove themselves individually before they are judged. People of color are more likely to be arrested for drug offenses despite using at a similar rate to white people. Some people do not survive these stereotypes. In , people of color who were unarmed and not attacking anyone were more likely to be killed by police. Those who survive instances of racial profiling—be they subtle or violent—do not escape unaffected.

They often suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder, and this trauma in turn affects their friends, families and immediate communities, who are exposed to their own vulnerability as a result. A study conducted in Australia which has its own hard history of subjugating black and Indigenous people perfectly illustrates how white privilege can manifest in day-to-day interactions—daily reminders that one is not worthy of the same benefit of the doubt given to another.

Researchers documented more than 1, attempts. The results: 72 percent of white people were allowed to stay on the bus. Only 36 percent of black people were extended the same kindness. They receive it as the byproduct of systemic racism and bias. And even if they are not aware of it in their daily lives as they walk along the streets, this privilege is the result of conscious choices made long ago and choices still being made today.

They are the purposeful results of racism—an ouroboros of sorts—that allow for the constant re-creation of inequality. And systemic racism cannot endure unless those powers still hold sway. You can imagine it as something of a whiteness water cycle, wherein racism is the rain.

That rain populates the earth, giving some areas more access to life and resources than others. The evaporation is white privilege—an invisible phenomenon that is both a result of the rain and the reason it keeps going. Who keeps it going? The answers to those questions could fill several books.

For example, the ability to accumulate wealth has long been a white privilege—a privilege created by overt, systemic racism in both the public and private sectors. Nor do they close the gap when they work full time, or when they spend less and save more. The gap, instead, relies largely on inheritance—wealth passed from one generation to the next. And that wealth often comes in the form of inherited homes with value. When white families are able to accumulate wealth because of their earning power or home value, they are more likely to support their children into early adulthood, helping with expenses such as college education, first cars and first homes.

The cycle continues. This is a privilege denied to many families of color, a denial that started with the work of public leaders and property managers. Before the crash, people of color were disproportionately targeted for subprime mortgages.

And neighborhood diversity continues to correlate with low property values across the United States. According to the Century Foundation , one-fourth of black Americans living in poverty live in high-poverty neighborhoods; only 1 in 13 impoverished white Americans lives in a high-poverty neighborhood. The inequities compound.

To this day, more than 80 percent of poor black students attend a high-poverty school, where suspension rates are often higher and resources often more limited.

Once out of school, obstacles remain. Economic forgiveness and trust still has racial divides. In a University of Wisconsin study, 17 percent of white job applicants with a criminal history got a call back from an employer; only five percent of black applicants with a criminal history got call backs. And according to the National Bureau of Economic Research , black Americans are percent more likely than white people to receive a high-cost mortgage, with Latino Americans 78 percent more likely.

This is after controlling for variables such as credit score and debt-to-income ratios. Why mention these issues in an article defining white privilege? Because the past and present context of wealth inequality serves as a perfect example of white privilege.

If privilege, from the Latin roots of the term, refers to laws that have an impact on individuals, then what is more effective than a history of laws that explicitly targeted racial minorities to keep them out of neighborhoods and deny them access to wealth and services?

This example of white privilege also illustrates how systemic inequities trickle down to less harmful versions of white privilege.

Understanding Race and Privilege

Across the nation, children of all backgrounds are experiencing a time in which discussions about race, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, religion, and culture are at the forefront of their everyday lives. Many people avoid these discussions because they fear that conversations about race, bias, and racism lead to feelings of anger, guilt, discomfort, sadness, and at times disrespect. The current state of our Union, however, no longer allows for these tough conversations to be ignored. While uncomfortable for some, school psychologists are in a position to lead or at least participate in these conversations. By using their knowledge and expertise of systems-level change, school psychologists can facilitate the dialogue to bring about positive, productive outcomes. This document is part of a series of resources developed by the National Association of School Psychologists NASP in response to recent acts of racial violence and the increasingly uncivil discourse occurring across our country.


Seeing White: An Introduction to White Privilege and Race [Jean Halley, Amy Eshleman, Ramya Mahadevan Vijaya] on childrenspolicycoalition.org *FREE* shipping on.


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Download the Study Guide. On one level, it seems Americans talk about race and ethnicity all the time. And yet. The premise of this series is that the American conversation about race, and the stories we tell ourselves about race and ethnicity, are deeply incomplete and often misleading.

For many, white privilege was an invisible force that white people needed to recognize. It was being able to walk into a store and find that the main displays of shampoo and panty hose were catered toward your hair type and skin tone. It was being able to turn on the television and see people of your race widely represented. It was being able to move through life without being racially profiled or unfairly stereotyped. All true.

Her work revolves around issues of social power , violence , white privilege , queer theory , animal studies , and trauma. Halley frequently uses elements of memoir in relating the topics of her books to her own biography.

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As you begin this module, it is important for you to know that I am white. Why am I telling you this? Because the fact that I am white has impacted, and continues to impact, how I experience the world. Because with my whiteness comes privilege and advantage. Because, as Dr. Robin Di Angelo argues, the first challenge white people face in working toward social justice, in working with Black, Indigenous, and People of Color BIPOC to create an inclusive and equitable world, is naming our race. Many white Americans do not recognize white as a race.

Whereas the origins of race are neither biological nor psychological, nonetheless in some sense, race becomes both psychological and biological due to the social. The social and those who wield social power mandate social phenomena — like segregation — that result in other phenomena like physical characteristics. Segregation, for instance, limits who interacts with whom in a human community in a particular place. In the United States, through laws, social customs, and sometimes, even outright terrorism as in the case of organizations like the Ku Klux Klan , white people have perpetrated ongoing and profound racial segregation of Black from white communities for centuries. Thus, for example, African Americans have largely lived only with other African Americans, and largely gone to school, worked, made friends, married and had children only with other African Americans. To a great extent this segregation exists still today, albeit no longer mandated by law. This social phenomenon, segregation, has meant that the physical characteristics of the Black community have been reproduced and passed on largely just to other members of the Black community.

Пользователь имел возможность создать любую гипотетическую ситуацию, и Мозговой штурм предсказывал, как эта ситуация повлияет на среду. Коммандер относился к этой программе с религиозным трепетом, но использовал ее не в политических целях: она служила ему для расчета времени, оценки информации и схематического отображения ситуации, выработки сложных стратегических решений и своевременного выявления слабых мест. Сьюзан не оставляло подозрение, что в компьютере шефа кроется нечто, чему в один прекрасный день суждено изменить весь мир. Да, я была с ним слишком сурова, - подумала Сьюзан. Ее мысли были прерваны внезапным звуковым сигналом входной двери Третьего узла. Стратмор чуть ли не вбежал в комнату. - Сьюзан, - сказал он, - только что позвонил Дэвид.

 - Ты уже задавал мне этот вопрос, помнишь. Пять месяцев. Я сказала .

 А вдруг Танкадо ошибся? - вмешался Фонтейн.  - Быть может, он не знал, что бомбы были одинаковые. - Нет! - отрезала Сьюзан.

 Ну что, вы решили. Я ее убиваю. Стратмор мгновенно взвесил все варианты. Если он позволит Хейлу вывести Сьюзан из шифровалки и уехать, у него не будет никаких гарантий. Они уедут, потом остановятся где-нибудь в лесу.

Выйдя на улицу, Беккер увидел у входа в парк телефонную будку. Он чуть ли не бегом бросился к ней, схватил трубку и вставил в отверстие телефонную карту. Соединения долго не .

Танкадо посмотрел на женщину, поднеся исковерканные пальцы прямо к ее лицу, как бы умоляя понять. Кольцо снова блеснуло на солнце.

 - Она безуспешно старалась говорить спокойно. Джабба нахмурился. - Мы это уже обсудили. Забыла.

Он нужен мне немедленно. - Ты сошла с ума! - крикнул в ответ Хейл.  - Я вовсе не Северная Дакота! - И он отчаянно забился на полу. - Не лги, - рассердилась Сьюзан.

Хейл, видимо, не догадывается, что она видела его внизу. - Стратмор знает, что я это видел! - Хейл сплюнул.  - Он и меня убьет. Если бы Сьюзан не была парализована страхом, она бы расхохоталась ему в лицо. Она раскусила эту тактику разделяй и властвуй, тактику отставного морского пехотинца.

Module 10: Unpacking Whiteness

Это очень важная часть! - заявил лейтенант.

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